State of the Union Exactly What You’d Expect – Updated with Video – We’ve Heard Some of it Before

You can read the full text of President Obama’s State of the Union address at National Journal. It was pretty much what you’d expect. He wants to invest lots of our money, and tax rich people more. But he swears he’s not engaging in class warfare.

Tax reform should follow the Buffett rule: If you make more than $1 million a year, you should not pay less than 30 percent in taxes. And my Republican friend Tom Coburn is right: Washington should stop subsidizing millionaires. In fact, if you’re earning a million dollars a year, you shouldn’t get special tax subsidies or deductions. On the other hand, if you make under $250,000 a year, like 98 percent of American families, your taxes shouldn’t go up. You’re the ones struggling with rising costs and stagnant wages. You’re the ones who need relief.

Now, you can call this class warfare all you want. But asking a billionaire to pay at least as much as his secretary in taxes? Most Americans would call that common sense.

We don’t begrudge financial success in this country. We admire it. When Americans talk about folks like me paying my fair share of taxes, it’s not because they envy the rich. It’s because they understand that when I get tax breaks I don’t need and the country can’t afford, it either adds to the deficit, or somebody else has to make up the difference – like a senior on a fixed income; or a student trying to get through school; or a family trying to make ends meet. That’s not right. Americans know it’s not right. They know that this generation’s success is only possible because past generations felt a responsibility to each other, and to their country’s future, and they know our way of life will only endure if we feel that same sense of shared responsibility. That’s how we’ll reduce our deficit. That’s an America built to last.

There’s a whole lot more. It seemed to go on forever. I was tweeting my thoughts. The general theme was that we need more and more government. If you can stand it, read the whole thing. It was more of a compaign speech than anything else.

Update: If you felt a sense of deja vu during the speech, you’re not alone. We’ve heard much of it before.