Obamacare’s $634 Million Website Still Experiencing Glitches

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Well, this is embarrassing. The Obama administration spent over $634 million of our tax dollars on the Obamacare website and it still isn’t working properly.

The site itself, which apparently underwent major code renovations over the weekend, still rejects user logins, fails to load drop-down menus and other crucial components for users that successfully gain entrance, and otherwise prevents uninsured Americans in the 36 states it serves from purchasing healthcare at competitive rates – Healthcare.gov’s primary purpose. The site is so busted that, as of a couple days ago, the number of people that successfully purchased healthcare through it was in the “single digits,” according to the Washington Post.

The reason for this nationwide headache apparently stems from poorly written code, which buckled under the heavy influx of traffic that its engineers and administrators should have seen coming. But the fact that Healthcare.gov can’t do the one job it was built to do isn’t the most infuriating part of this debacle – it’s that we, the taxpayers, seem to have forked up more than $634 million of the federal purse to build the digital equivalent of a rock.

The exact cost to build Healthcare.gov, according to U.S. government records, appears to have been $634,320,919, which we paid to a company you probably never heard of: CGI Federal.  The company originally won the contract back in 2011, but at that time, the cost was expected to run “up to” $93.7 million – still a chunk of change, but nothing near where it ended up. (Read More)

One computer programmer says it appears that that there was no testing done on the site before it went live. I guess $634 million doesn’t go as far as it used to.

Yesterday on the House floor, Speaker Boehner asked “How can we tax people for not buying a product from a website that doesn’t work?” That’s a good question, but I doubt he’ll get a good answer from the Obama administration. They’ll just keep blaming it on heavy traffic.